Mother of Caligula- Agrippina Inscription- Joe Geranio

Mother of Caligula- Agrippina Inscription-

Mother of Caligula- Agrippina Inscription-

Another rare inscription for the funerary inscription for Agrippina Major.  Beautiful and rare to still be in our midst. 
probably from Augustus’ mausoleum, where her son Caligula had her ashes delivered (from Pandateria where she was exiled and starved herself to death in 33 CE) when he became emperor in 37 CE. Inscription: OSSA/AGRIPPINAE M[ARCI] AGRIPPAE/DIVI AVG[usti] NEPTIS VXORIS/GERMANICI CAESARIS/MATRIS C[AI] CAESARIS AVG[USTI]/ GERMANICI PRINCIPIS (CIL 6.886). A cavity (not visible) on top once held the urn with her ashes. Rome: Passaggio del Muro Romano (Museo Nuovo) of the Museo del Palazzo dei Conservatori.

In 14 A.D. Augustus’ own ashes were placed here (Cass. Dio LVI.42; Tac. Ann. I.8). He had in his will excluded his daughter Julia and her daughter from burial in his mausoleum (Suet. Aug. 101; Cass. Dio LVI.32). Hirschfeld seems to lay too much stress on the statement in the Mirabilia (§ 22, ap. Jord. II.629) that there was an apse in the centre of the mausoleum, in which there had been a seated statue of Augustus. Next followed (soon after 19) Germanicus (Tac. Ann. III.4: reliquiae p334tumulo Augusto inferebantur; two fragments of an elogium of him carved on blocks,4 belonging to the facing of the base, are given in CIL VI.894 = 31194). For his children, see Ustrinum Domus Augustae. Livia’s ashes were placed here in 29 A.D. (Cass. Dio LVIII.2.3) and eight years later those of Tiberius (our classical authorities do not expressly mention it, but they would undoubtedly have emphasised his exclusion; and CIL VI.885, the inscription on his funeral urn, which was still preserved in the sixteenth century, agrees absolutely in content with the rest of those from the mausoleum). His successor Caligula, whose mother Agrippina and brothers Nero and Drusus had died — the first two in exile, the last in the cellars of the Palatine — collected their remains and placed them here (Cass. Dio LIX.3: τὰ ὀστᾶ τά τε τῆς μητρὸς καὶ τὰ τῶν ἀδελφῶν τῶν ἀποθανόντων; Suet. Tib. 54: amborum sic reliquias dispersas ut vix quandoque colligi possent). The block of marble which bears the inscription in honour of Agrippina, and once contained an urn of more precious material in which her cremated remains (ossa) were placed, is still preserved in the Palazzo dei Conservatori (CIL VI.886), while a block with the inscription of the elder Nero only disappeared after the sixteenth century (ib. 887). The mention of both brothers in the passages quoted above would certainly lead one to believe that the younger Drusus’ remains were similarly treatedHirschfeld thinks that Caligula’s sister Drusilla was also placed here, but there is no direct evidence/  Platner and Ashby: 

Mausoleum Augusti

Article on pp332‑336 of

Samuel Ball Platner (as completed and revised by Thomas Ashby):
A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome,
London: Oxford University Press, 1929.

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Caligula Inscription on Wine Barrel- Joe Geranio

Caligula Win Barrel Inscription

Caligula Win Barrel Inscription

 

Caligula Wine Barrel Inscription

CCAEAVGGER

Non coinage objects with Gaius Caliula’s nomen are very rare, I know of a lead pipe at the Nemi Museum.
In 40, the emperor Caligula visited Fectio when he was travelling to Lugdunum. The remains of a wine barrel from his personal vinyard have been found. Some thirty years later, the fortress was destroyed during the Batavian revolt and rebuilt as base of a cavalry squadron. The river Rhine had already started to silt up, and was later to change its course. Pottery from the kilns of the Twenty-second legion Primigenia at Xanten belongs to this period.

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Caligula Inscription on Lead Pipe from Nemi Ship- Joe Geranio

Caligula Pipe with Inscription from Nemi Ship

Caligula Pipe with Inscription from Nemi Ship

Caligula Water Pipe found on Boat Lake Nemi

The Romans produced suction force pumps in all types for all sea and land necessities. One of the archeological discoveries which most contributed to on/ knowledge of Roman metallurgy was the recovery of two ships of lake Nemi… These ships contained lead pipe (in the ship plumbing system), valves, pieces of equipment including a rotating table on ball bearings and several metallic objects made from various alloys of iron, copper and bronze which vary according to their intended use. The lead pipe conforms to the dimensions and norms set in Frontinus’ text… The inscriptions on the lead pipe found on the Nemi ships have done more to date the ships than the masonry trademarks… But the precise dating of the Nemi Ships based on the name of Caligula (37 to 41 A.D.) has been established by the for fstulae found three inside the first ship and the fourth nearby with their seal G. CAESARIS AVG GERMANIC all stamped with the same die (evidenced by the imperfect impression of the C on the various pieces of pipe)… The valve found on board is according to the standards a vicenaria in perfect working condition… The rotating platform found on the Nemi ship establishes that the Romans were acquainted with and used ball-bearings. Bronze bearings fixed in place by pins were positioned around the circumference of the platform at regular intervals to permit the rotary movement scythe load. Photo used with permission from (Photo by Nacleben)

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Caligula Statue Base from Sardis- Joe Geranio

Caligula Statue Base- Very Rare

Caligula Statue Base- Very Rare

You can imagine how rare this statue base is from Sardis.  There once stood a statue of Caligula who ruled from 37-41 A.D.
Emperor: Caligula        
Province: Asia Town: Sardis Context:  
Lower date: 37 Upper date: 41 Dating criteria:  
Type of monument: Unknown
Dimensions (hxwxd): 1.18 x 2.06 x 0.26 m.   Letter size: 0.09 m.    
Type of dedicator: Public, community
Dedicator:  
   
           
Lemmata: AE: En 1965, dans les fondations d’un édifice d’époque tardive, au SE de la synagogue. Bloc de marbre brisé à g., avec moulure sup. abattue; surface inscrite détruite en b. à g. Les deux dernières lettres de la première l. sont gravées sur un martelage. Herrmann: Besonders eindrücksvoll ist ein über zwei Meter breiter Marmorblock, der 1965 freigelegt wurde, und zwar im Unterbau eines spätantiken Tetrapylon.
           
Bibliography: AE 1995, 1459. SEG 45, 1645. P. Herrmann, Sardeis, in E. Schwertheim, Forschungen in Lydien, Asia Minor Studien 17 (Bonn 1995) 31-32.
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The Julio Claudian Ravenna Relief- Joe Geranio

The Julio Claudian Ravenna Releif- photo prof. Pollini

The Julio Claudian Ravenna Releif- photo prof. Pollini

The Julio Claudian Ravenna Releif- photo prof. Pollini

The Julio Claudian Ravenna Releif- photo prof. Pollini

 Ravenna Relief- Julio Claudian Period

Photo Courtesy of Prof. John Pollini

Portrait statues left to right:

Uncertain identity of seated female figure, cuirassed statue of a Julio Claudian prince (Agrippa?); statue wearing a hip mantle and shown with a star carved in relief over the forehead (Divus Julius?) Female portrait characterized as venus genetrix by the tiny figure of cupid (sometimes identified as Livia?) Augustus wearing his hip mantle and corona civica and rayed crown, with his left foot on globe; he once held a sceptre in his raised hand; in his left is preserved traces of a thunderbolt.

Usually dated to the reign of Claudius (41-54 A.D.)  Some think the reign of Caligula? (37-41 A.D.)

Height 1.04 m.

Ravenna Musuem
There were two marble fragments found from the Claudian period? that now reside at the Museo National in Ravenna Italy. It could have been an altar or other monument, it was found near or in the mausoleum of Galla Placidia in the sixteenth century. The fragment relief was meant to depict a dynastic statuary group from the Julio Claudian dynasty. Who were these figures and what did they represent?

www.flickr.com/photos/julio-c…14320/sizes/o/

This is the first public relief (monument) to show the imperial family in full portrait frontality. There were republican funerary monuments that showed full frontality, but not of the imperial family. We can clearly see Augustus as Mars (Far Right) idnetified by his hairstyle and pyhsiognomy Augustus is also wearing the “Corona Civicta”. (To the left) of Augustus we have Livia as Venus, Eros is on her left shoulder, and wearing a tiara. Her dress is based on Venus Genetrix of the fifth century B.C. (To the left) of Livia we have Germanicus, brother of Claudius. The figure to the left of Germanicus appears to be Drusus the elder, Patriae Claudiu. The seated figure on the (far left) has been identified as either Antonia (mother of Claudius or a representation of pietas.

 

Could it be the following: 

Caption: 
JulioClaudian apotheosis. Marble relief plaque depicting the apotheosis of the JulioClaudian family, from Ravenna: front panel. From left to right: Drusus the Elder (?), Germanicus (?), Antonia (with Eros, indicating identification as Venus), Augustus (wearing corona civica, with attributes of Zeus). ca. 50 AD. Ravenna, Museo Nazionale.?
Andreae 1983, 54-56, 63, figs. 122-24, 126-30, showing the previous hit Ravenna  relief next hit (fig. 8) at fig. 132; Andreae 1982, 203-6, fig. at p. 205; identical crown, dress slightly modified to the diva type developed by Caligula for Drusilla (i.e., the triangular “apron”; see Rose 1987, s.v. Drusilla), but Amor here stands upon Antonia’s hand at hip level, leaning on her left shoulder and looking up in her face.
 31. See pp. 33, 228 n. 92. The Venus: Gros 1976a, 162, 168; the Mars: Gros 1976a, 166-68; Zanker 1988, 199, 201-3, 347.
32. The problematic Belvedere and Vicus Sandaliarius altars are sometimes held to depict Venus. Belvedere altar: Fullerton 1985, 482; Zanker 1988, 222, s.v. fig. 17. Vicus Sandaliarius altar: Zanker 1988, 129, fig. 101; Rose 1987, cat. Rome 03; Hölscher 1984c, 27f.; p. 242 n. 126 and p. 247 n. 38 below (epiphany compositions). On both also Pollini 1987, 30f, nn. 65f; Zanker 1969, 209-10. The Belvedere female who watches a chariot apotheosis may be Venus, but Rose has convinced me that the Vicus Sandaliarius female is a human priestess rather than Ceres, Vesta, etc.
33. Fittschen 1976, 175-21O; Zanker 1988, fig. 178.
34. Zanker alone in 1969 noted the BR Venus, grouping it with the Temple of Mars Ultor pediment (fig. 9b), the previous hit Ravenna  relief next hit (fig. 8), and the Belvedere altar “Venus,” not distinguishing between chiton and tunic figures.
35. The list in LIMC II (1984), s.v. “Aphrodite,” sec. 19.A.I.d, is too brief., like the rest of the Aphrodite section, it is arbitrary in citing Roman (Venus) types.
36. The tunicate Venus type was adapted on the Augustan “Actium relief” series now in Budapest for the figure of a goddess with cornucopia, baby, and slipped sleeve; Simon 1986, fig. 35.
37. Not adduced by Fittschen 1979. Fittschen’s important article established that the half-naked hero seen here, on the Algiers relief (fig. 6), on Augustan coinage is Divus Julius, quoted for Germanicus on the previous hit Ravenna  relief next hit (fig. 8). This figure Fittschen and others attribute to the Temple of Divus Julius in the Forum; however, on coins of 37-34 B.C. that statue is visible in its temple as a figure capite velato holding up a lituus . RRC 540/1-2; Kais. Aug. 1988, cat. 308 (Trillmich); Kent 1978, cat. 118; Simon 1986, fig. 108
38. Thus also the Venus to be restored on the Sorrento base cannot have had Amor on her shoulder, as he stands by Mars; see fig. 15b and p. 220 n. 13.
39. Zanker 1972, 9-10; Zanker 1988, 81, 97, 266, and figs. 62b (coin), 65 (terracotta antefix), 208 (lamp), 214 (bronze stand); Weinstock 1971, 50-51; Hölscher 1967, 9-17 (the BR cup at p. 9); Hölscher 1984a, 26; and Hölscher in Kais. Aug . 1988, 374 and figs. 170-72, s.v. cat. 207 (Campana plaque series from around Rome showing Augustus’ Victoria with a standard and Capricorns). Hölscher (1984a, 9-10) notes: “Sie . . . müssen eher als Ausdruck loyaler Gesinnung gewisser Privatpersonen gedeutet werden”; cf. also Zanker 1988, 265-78.
 

This is the first public relief (monument) to show the imperial family in full portrait frontality.   There were republican funerary monuments that showed full frontality, but not of the imperial family.  We can clearly see Augustus as Mars (Far Right) idnetified by his hairstyle and pyhsiognomy  Augustus is also wearing the “Corona Civicta”.  (To the left) of Augustus we have Livia as Venus, Eros is on her left shoulder, and wearing a tiara.  Her dress is based on Venus Genetrix of the fifth century B.C.   (To the left) of Livia we have Germanicus, brother of Claudius.  The figure to the left of Germanicus appears to be Drusus the elder, Patriae Claudiu.   The seated figure on the (far left) has been identified as either Antonia (mother of Claudius or a representation of pietas.     

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